For Immediate Release
Press Contact: Brown Katherine, Public Health Program Coordinator, (510) 981-5289

COB CHILDHOOD LEAD POISONING PREVENTION PROGRAM RESPONDS TO RECALLED LUNCH BOXES AND TOYS

Berkeley, California (Thursday, October 04, 2007) - The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) has recently issued an announcement to urge consumers to stop using lunch boxes which have been distributed as CDPH nutrition educational items, after testing showed elevated levels of lead in three lunch boxes. For more information about the recall, please visit the following link: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/healthinfo/news/Pages/PH07-39.aspx 

Residents who think they may have gotten a contaminated lunch box from one of the CDPH nutritional programs - the Network for a Healthy California and the Woman, Infants, and Children's (WIC) - are encouraged to drop them off by Wednesday, October 31st, at one of the following locations:

Bay Area Hispano Institute for Advancement, Inc. (BAHIA)
1000 Camelia Street (at Ninth Street)
Hours: Monday-Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Habitot Children's Museum
2065 Kittredge Street (at Allston Way)
Hours: Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday, 9:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Berkeley Head Start/Early Head Start - West Berkeley YMCA - Main Office
2009 10th Street (at University Avenue)
Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Images of the lunch boxes are displayed on the City of Berkeley Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program webpage: www.ci.berkeley.ca.us/publichealth/leadpoisoning/lead.html

There will not be any exchange for recalled lunch boxes or toys.

Lead is a well known hazard. Children may be exposed from contaminated products through normal hand-to-mouth behavior. Some mild health effects include hyperactivity, irritability, and learning disabilities, while severe effects include nausea and vomiting, headaches, hearing problems, and neurological impairments such as stumbling and loss of concentration. If you have any reason to suspect that your child has been exposed to lead, please remove the product from your child. Your child's health care provider can help you decide whether to perform a blood tested to see if your child has an elevated blood lead level. A blood test is the only way you can tell if your child has an elevated level. Most children with elevated blood lead levels have no symptoms. The health care provider can recommend treatment if your child has been exposed to lead.

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